2010-2011

SEPTEMBER 16 - OCTOBER 24, 2010 Shan Goshorn - Reclaiming Cultural Ownership: Challenging Indian Stereotypes

As a feature of the Fine Art Museum's upcoming Crossing Boundaries exhibit series is a provocative installation focusing on "unlearning" stereotypes and fostering Native pride by noted Eastern Band of Cherokee Indian artist Shan Goshorn. An artist for more than 25 years, Goshorn has exhibited her work across the United States, Canada, Europe, China and Africa. Her work addresses contemporary American Indian and human rights issues, including Indian stereotypes and treaty violations. Goshorn has won prestigious awards throughout the country and internationally. In 2001, the Indian Affairs Commission of Tulsa honored her with the Moscelyn Larkin Cultural Achievement Award.


OCTOBER 7 - 24, 2010
The New Sugar BFA Graduating Artists Portfolio Exhibition

Titled The New Sugar, the exhibition will include a mix of ceramics, drawing, painting, printmaking and sculpture by 12 students who are part of a class taught by Marya Roland, associate professor of art, that prepares students for entry into the professional art world. Participating students are Christine Cady, sculpture; Michael Dodson, sculpture; Lisa Erato, painting; Allyson Greer, printmaking; Rachael Griffin, painting; Lauren Hill, printmaking; Alexandra Kirtley, printmaking; Sarah Lovell, painting; Michelle McAfee, sculpture; Constance McCormick, ceramics; Janine Paris, drawing; and Traci Pierce, ceramics.


Rick Conn image

NOVEMBER 2 - 5 and 9 - 12, 2010
MFA Graduating Artist Solo Exhibitions

NOVEMBER 2 - 5
Rick Conn, MFA Thesis Exhibit: DEVICE
Reception: Friday, NOVEMBER 5, 2-4pm

Image Credit: Rick Conn, detail "2", 2010

NOVEMBER 9 - 12
Tracy Kirchmann, MFA Thesis Exhibit
Reception: Thursday, NOVEMBER 11, 4-6pm

Features the creative research by MFA degree candidates, the solo exhibitions in a variety of media reveal advanced critical analysis of each artist s creative process and personal passion as emerging art studio professionals.


NOVEMBER 17 20, 2010
AIDS Memorial Quilt Exhibit
Reception: November 17, 6-7:30

Organized by A.K. Hinds University Center and the Department of Campus Recreation and Wellness the Fine Art Museum presents sections of the internationally celebrated AIDS Memorial Quilt the 54-ton, handmade tapestry that stands as a memorial to more than 91,000 individuals lost to AIDS. Established in 1987, The NAMES Project Foundation is the international organization that is the custodian of The AIDS Memorial Quilt. The AIDS Memorial Quilt began with a single panel created in San Francisco in 1987. Today, The Quilt is composed of more than 47,000 individual 3 x 6 foot panels, each one commemorating the life of someone who has died of AIDS. These panels come from every state in the nation, every corner of the globe and they have been sewn by hundreds of thousands of friends, lovers and family members into this epic memorial, the largest piece of ongoing community art in the world.

Organized by A.K. Hinds University Center and the Department of Campus Recreation and Wellness the Fine Art Museum presents sections of the internationally celebrated AIDS Memorial Quilt the 54-ton, handmade tapestry that stands as a memorial to more than 91,000 individuals lost to AIDS. Established in 1987, The NAMES Project Foundation is the international organization that is the custodian of The AIDS Memorial Quilt. The AIDS Memorial Quilt began with a single panel created in San Francisco in 1987. Today, The Quilt is composed of more than 47,000 individual 3 x 6 foot panels, each one commemorating the life of someone who has died of AIDS. These panels come from every state in the nation, every corner of the globe and they have been sewn by hundreds of thousands of friends, lovers and family members into this epic memorial, the largest piece of ongoing community art in the world.

Image: One block from the AIDS Memorial Quilt
For more information, visit the WCU AIDS Quilt Project website here: http://www.wcu.edu/27735.asp


OCTOBER 24 - DECEMBER 18, 2010
Mike Smith: Photographs of Appalachia

Public Reception: Sunday, October 24, 2-4 p.m.



 

Mike Smith exposes the human impact on the landscape from aged, weather-softened farm buildings that seem to be an organic part of the landscape to the jarring reality of bright, new multi-pump gas stations. Smith's photographs of rural Tennessee portray the lush beauty of the land, even as they reveal the suburban encroachment that threatens much of rural Appalachia. A Guggenheim Fellow, Mike Smith is a Professor of Art at Eastern Tennessee State University and founding member of the Appalachian Photographers Project. His works have been acquired by most major museums in the US including the MoMA and the Metropolitan Museum. His monograph "You're Not from Around Here" was published in 2004. Exhibits include works shown at the Whitney Museum and San Francisco MoMA.

Image: Kingsport, TN 2003, 19" x 36"

Join us to celebrate the Fine Art Museum's 5th Anniversary and honor acclaimed photographer Mike Smith.


JANUARY 20 - MARCH 26
In Sunshine and In Shadow: The Patrick Hall International Residency and the WNC University Student Collaborators

Tasmanian artist Patrick Hall collaborated with 18 students from UNC-Asheville, Western Carolina University, Appalachian State University, Haywood Community College and Blue Ridge Community College to create "In Sunshine and in Shadow" a mixed media sculpture, during Hall's International Artist Residency that took place in May 2009 at Marshall High Studios in Marshall, NC. Hall's residency was hosted by the Center for Craft, Creativity & Design, and partnering institutions noted above. This exhibit features selected work by students who participated in this residency, as well as documentary photographs of the month long residency. The primary area of focus for this residency was an examination of the transitory nature of human experience. The physical outcome of the project, which Hall calls In Sunshine or in Shadow, was to make a small caravan, a mobile holiday home on wheels. The surface cladding of this vehicle of memory and spaceship for future travel would be hundreds of pairs of sun and eyeglasses and over 300 LED lights. Western Carolina University student participating in the Patrick Hall Residency were, Britney Carroll, MFA '09; Courtney Chappell, MFA '11; Faye Holliday, BFA '11; Mike Polomik, MFA '10; Faye Holliday, BFA '11; Janine Paris, BFA '10 Tracy Kirchmann, MFA '10; and Brandon Guthrie , MFA '09, serving as Faculty Advisor.


FEBRUARY 17 - MARCH 4
Video Art screening series : works on loan from the Electronic Arts Intermix - New York, NY.

Co-curated by WCU Art History Professor Seth McCormick, the video art screening series will run throughout the spring semester and feature a range of works in the collection of EAI. We kick off this series with two early works that echo the performance-based roots of video art. These two works deal with issues of synchronization and feedback between the live and the recorded image, exploring the way it conditions the relationship between performer and audience.

Vito Acconci art Remote Control
Vito Acconci
1971, 62:30 min, b&w, sound, Two Channels
With: Vito Acconci, Kathy Dillon

The two-channel piece Remote Control is an exercise in manipulation and control between artist and subject, male and female. On separate channels, the viewer sees Acconci and Kathy Dillon sitting alone in wooden boxes in different rooms, each facing a static camera. Although they can only see and hear each other on separate monitors, they attempt to interact and respond to one another directly, as if their communication were unmediated. Through language and gesture, Acconci tries to manipulate Dillon's actions from his box, as though by remote control. He instructs her to tie herself up with rope, gesturing as though he were actually in her presence, cajoling her to perform his commands, convincing himself that he is in control: "I'm bringing the rope over your knees... I'm lifting your legs gently." The isolation and displacement of the couple, and the viewer's voyeuristic position, serve to heighten the undercurrent of dominance and submission. Dillon, who at first silently complies with Acconci's commands, eventually reacts to his manipulation with an assertion of her own will.

Lip Sync
Bruce Nauman
1969, 57 min, b&w, sound

With the camera mounted upside down, framing only his mouth and neck, Nauman repeats the phrase "lip sync" over and over in loud whisper. Sound and image are intentionally unsynchronized, while the upside-down view of his lips and tongue in action provides a further disorienting quality to the work.


FEBRUARY 21- 25

School of Art & Design Master of Fine Arts Thesis Exhibitions: Courtney Chappell

Image: I Can See Your House From Here, 12" x 12", 2006

I Can See Your House from Here



Video Art screening series : works on loan from the Electronic Arts Intermix - New York, NY

Co-curated by WCU Art History Professor Seth McCormick, the video art screening series will run throughout the spring semester and feature a range of works in the collection of EAI.

MARCH 17 - APRIL 1
Input : Output -from video to performance

This series centers on works from the late sixties and early seventies that deal with issues of synchronization and feedback between the live and the recorded image, exploring the way it conditions the relationship between performer and audience.

This series centers on works from the late sixties and early seventies that deal with issues of synchronization and feedback between the live and the recorded image, exploring the way it conditions the relationship between performer and audience.

Left Side Right Side
Joan Jonas
1972, 8:50 min, b&w, sound
In this early work, Jonas translates her performance strategies to video, applying the inherent properties of the medium to her investigations of the self and the body. Jonas performs in a direct, one-on-one confrontation with the viewer, using the immediacy and intimacy of video as conceptual constructs. Exploring video as both a mirror and a masking device, and using her body as an art object, she undertakes an examination of self and identity, subjectivity and objectivity. Creating a series of inversions, she splits her image, splits the video screen, and splits her identification within the video space, playing with the spatial ambiguity of non-reversed images (video) and reversed images (mirrors). Though Jonas' approach is formalist and reductive, her performance reveals an ironic theatricality. Illustrating the phenomenology of video as a mirror, Left Side Right Side is a classic of early performance-based, conceptual video.

Performer/Audience/Mirror
Dan Graham
1975, 22:52 min, b&w, sound
Recorded at Video Free America in San Francisco, this work is a phenomenological inquiry into the audience/performer relationship and the notion of subjectivity/objectivity. Graham stands in front of a mirrored wall facing a seated audience; he describes the audience's movements and what they signify. He then turns and describes himself and the audience in the mirror. Graham writes: "Through the use of the mirror the audience is able to instantaneously perceive itself as a public mass (as a unity), offsetting its definition by the performer ('s discourse). The audience sees itself reflected by the mirror instantly while the performer's comments are slightly delayed. First, a person in the audience sees himself 'objectively' ('subjectively') perceived by himself, next he hears himself described 'objectively' ('subjectively') in terms of the performer's perception."


MARCH 22 APRIL 15
ESSE QUAM VIDERI

This exhibition includes 20 self portraits made by Muslim Americans living in North Carolina. The artist has worked with the Muslim community across the state for over two years to compile this series of images and stories. It is sponsored by the Center for Global Initiatives at UNC Chapel Hill and is being shown statewide. The goal of the project is to help the non-Muslim understand this community in a more well rounded, realistic light as compared to the stereotypes and single issue coverage given them in the mainstream media. Many college students do not know a Muslim. This project creates a line of communication directly from the Muslim community to the student. The content of the exhibition ranges from protest to celebration with an overall message that reaffirms our shared humanity. More information online at http://www.muslimselfportrait.info/.

Join us for an artist talk by project director Todd Drake, currently an artist in residence at UNC Chapel Hill s Center for Global Initiatives, March 22, 2011 at 6 p.m. in the Fine and Performing Arts Center room 130.


MARCH 24 APRIL 29
Susan Harbage Page

School of Art & Design Spring 2011 Artist in Residence, Page, creates large-scale photographs, altered textiles, videos and installations that address such concerns as race and gender, identity, politics and immigration.

Join us for an artist talk by Susan Harbage Page, March 24, 2011 at 4 p.m. in the Fine & Performing Arts Center room 130.


APRIL 7 MAY 6
School of Art & Design 43rd Annual Art Student Juried Exhibition

An independently juried exhibition featuring the best of new and innovative creative expression in a variety of media by undergraduates of the School of Art & Design. This year s jurors include Jolene Mechanic, curator of Flood Gallery Fine Art Center and Cameron Campbell-Wilkens, Design Strategist.


APRIL 6 JUNE 24 Boundless: Selections from the Book Arts Collection

Boundless explores a wide variety of formats and structures of the Artist Book, a synthesis of form and content which provides a bridge between the traditional book and contemporary art. This exhibit will include a variety of artists including noted Book Artists like Joni Mabe and Dieter Roth as well unique books by photographers, sculptors and painters like Ed Ruscha. Visitors are encouraged to handle a select grouping of tactile books where a viewer s actions are required to complete the aesthetic idea.


Video Art screening series : works on loan from the Electronic Arts Intermix - New York, NY

Co-curated by WCU Art History Professor Seth McCormick, the video art screening series will run throughout the spring semester and feature a range of works in the collection of EAI.

APRIL 28 MAY 13

Hannah Wilke Through the Large Glass
Hannah Wilke
1976, 10 min, color, silent

Organic Honey s Visual Telepathy
Joan Jonas
1972, 17:24 min, b&w, sound


May 19 - August 5 Rough and Tumble: Landscapes and Cityscapes from the Collection

This exhibit features works in a variety of media that depict the natural and unnatural scenery of our planet. Featuring works by Fumio Fujita, Quita Brodhead, Richard Florsheim, Martha Armstrong, Louis Finkelstein and more.














THE FINE ART MUSEUM