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Cherokee Phoenix and Indians' Advocate
Wednesday, November 4, 1829
Vol. II, no. 30
Page 2, col. 5b-Page 3 col. 1a

NEW ECHOTA, Oct. 30, 1829

 MR. BOUDINOTT,- Before I take leave of this place, perhaps never again to re-visit it, I must claim the indulgence of making a few remarks through the Phoenix, for the purpose of correcting some statements, that have been associated with my name and busily circulated here statements if not corrected, not only calculated to injure my character, but to feed the spleen of my enemies, and to wound the feelings of my best friends.

 It has been reported that upon my being denied the right of pleading the cause of J. Pettit before the Honorable Committee and Council, I left the Council room in a rage, and gave utterance to these words: "the day will come when I will have satisfaction and revenge."  That these words never dropped from my lips, I do most solemnly and unhesitatingly, affirm, so far from it they never had a place within the range of my thoughts, and I challenge any man to establish them upon the basis of truth.  All that I said was, that "the gentlemen of the Committee and Council will have to answer for their conduct in the coming day," alluding to the day of Judgment, and the bar of their God.

 It is also reported that I expressed, sometime afterwards, a satisfaction upon the remembrance that there was a prospect of the time not being far distant, when I could reap revenge under the enactments of the State of Georgia,- but this statement, is as unfounded and as false as the other.  It is well calculated, if true, to injure & blnst [sic] my character.I will not say that my acts were altogether blameless on the occasion, but this much I can and do say, that were the motive by which I was influenced as well known to my countrymen as it is to my Maker, they would not censure me as much as some do.  But every tree will be known by its fruit, and I rest perfectly satisfied under the conviction that at some day or other, my countrymen will be convinced that my attachment to my country is durable.

       WILLIAM ROGERS.