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CHEROKEE PHOENIX AND INDIANS' ADVOCATE
Wednesday, May 27, 1829
Vol. II, no. 8
Page 2, col. 3b.

  Memphis, T. May 2--Choctaw & Chickasaw Indians. -- The disposition, and anxiety, to obtain the lands of these people is becoming every day more manifest, and we should not be surprised if the Mississippi legislature were,ere long, to compel them to a removal, by extending their municipal regulations over them.  This measure has been repeatedly threatened, and as often deferred under the expectation that the Indians would, by treaty with the General Government, surrender their lands, and thereby obviate  the necessity of resorting to so arbitrary a measure.  We are advocates for their removal upon two considerations.  In the first place because we believe they cannot possibly subsist, for any considerable length of time where they now are; and secondly, because the country, to which it is proposed to remove them, appears to be well suited to their habits, wants, and well
being.----Adv.
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5-27-29
Page 2 Col. 4b

  CHOCTAWS

 We rejoice sincerely to notice the progress of improvement so plainly exhibited by our brethren the Choctaws.  From the interesting communication of the Rev. Mr. Kingsbury, copied in our first page from the Missionary Herald, our readers will perceive that they are rapidly following the Cherokees.  We earnestly with that their progress may be uninterrupted- that they may not have to encounter the difficulties under which we have been labouring [sic].  Perhaps Mississippi will be more generous benevolent and just to the Choctaws and Chickasaws, than Georgia has been to us.  If that should be  the case, we may rest assured that the Choctaws will become a civilized people.  When the prospects are so bright among so many of the Indian tribes, when we hear of the astonishing progress of improvement in morals and religion, not only among the Southern, but also among the Northern Indians, is it not mortifying to common sense, that their removal should be so repeatedly urged on the ground of their civilization?