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Cherokee Phoenix
Vol. I No. 42
Wednesday, December 29, 1828
Pg. 2 Col. 2a

 In the Georgia Legislature, when the question of Cherokee lands was under consideration, Mr. Wofford, a member from Habersham, is said to have used the following words.

 "The majority of these Indians [Cherokees] do not wish to remain where they are.  But they are kept there by cunning white men, and half breeds, for their own purposes.  It is not the interest of the Indians to stay there, and if they were not restrained, they would not remain one year in the territory."

 The bare faced falsehood of the above remark will appear evident from the following extract of a letetr from a respectable gentleman.

 "After all the exertions and influence of the Agent, in his recruiting tour for emigrants, he has failed to effect anything.  After his return he despatched the Deputy Agent and U. States Interpreter through the Nation, to take a list of those who wished to emigrate and endeavor to get as many as possible, but they returned without obtaining the first one to give his consent."

 Be it known to all whom it may concern, that cunning white men and half breeds have had no influence in preventing the emigration of the Cherokees.  Every person who wishes to emigrate has the perfect right to do so.  The fact is, every citizen of this Nation is cunning.