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Cherokee Phoenix
Vol. I No. 41
Wednesday December 10, 1828
Pg. 2 Col. 5a

From the Savannah Georgian.
THE CHEROKEES AND GEORGIA.
The good faith, honorable conduct, and Superior civilization of white men.

 When the United States, on the 24th of April 1802, entered into an agreement with one of themselves, for the extinguishment of the title of the Cherokees to a part of their (the Cherokee) lands, a treaty was at that very time in existence, between the Cherokees and said United States, (of which Georgia then was, and still is one,) containing the following articles.

 "Art. 7. THE UNITED STATES SOLEMNLY GUARANTY TO THE CHEROKEE NATION, ALL THEIR LANDS NOT HEREBY CEDED."

 "Art. 14.- That the Cherokee Nation may be led to a greater degree of civilization and become herdsmen and cultivators, instead of remaining in a state of hunters, the United States will from time to time furnish gratuitously, the said nation with useful implements of husbandry;&c."

 The joint Committee of Georgia on the State of the Republic, in their report of 5th December, 1827, complain that the United States  have managed "so to add to the comforts of the Cherokees, and so instruct them in the business of husbandry, as to attach them so firmly to their country, and to their homes, as almost to destroy the last ray of hope that they would ever consent to part with the Georgia lands,"- and declare that "the lands in question belong to Georgia-she must and she will have them."

 Under any, but particularly under the circumstances of this case, what monstrous sentiments, what detestable principles, are here promulgated.- If this be the result of the white man's sciences and arts, of his civilization and Christianity; if this be a sample of his good faith and his regard for the fame and honor of is country, I thank the Great Spirit that he has kept me free from their contamination.
      OUTALISSI.