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CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Wednesday May 14, 1828
Volume 1 No. 12
Page 2 col. 5b and Page 3 col. 1
 
 

The Editor of the Statesman & Patriot

(a Georgia paper,) has the following article-"Though much has been said about the Cherokee civilization, we are of opinion that many strides must be taken before those Indians may with truth be termed a civilized people.  The Phoenix of the 2d instant furnishes matter of ill omen as to the success of the new constitution.  A system of thievery, by which property is run into the white settlement, is said to exist even around New Echota; and frequent murders are committed without the perpetrators being apprehended or brought to trial!"
 This Editor, perhaps, is not aware that the instigators, leaders and principals, of this system of thievery are whitemen [sic], citizens of Georgia.  He will inform us how many strides, these must take "before they can with truth be termed a civilized people."

 We are told,( and we have no reason to dispute it) that our white neighbors, who have taken the place of our more honest neighbors Creeks, are continually trespassing on the rights of our citizens, by stealing every species of property, and they do it with impunity.  Some of these men it is said, are civil officers of the State of Georgia, the very same persons to whom the proclamation of his Excellency Gov. Forsythe is directed.
 
 The same Editor, speaking upon what we had formerly said, respecting the right of the Cherokees to the lands now in their possession, on the ground of occupancy, observes, "Strolling over a country is somewhat different from a permanent occupancy."  Query. What kind of occupancy have those, who have never even strolled over a country?