First Year Seminars Fall 2011

CRN SUBJECT COURSE SECTION
ART 191 - Integral Arts                                                                                             
80714  ART  191  01
For new first year students only, this course will explore the integral nature of the arts: how we live, record our life and world, and imagine our future.  Whether we paint, sculpt, act, sing, dance, or write, we have something to share.  Often, many or even all of the art forms work in concert to share their vision.   This course is arts intensive and is strongly recommended for those with an interest in the arts.  As students examine the intersections of art to art and arts to life, this course will bring theory to life through experience and engaged collaboration.  This course is part of a triad that includes THEA 191 and MUS 191.  All three sections collaborate as a partnership to provide a rich arts experience as students and instructors from all three sections interact in a dynamic exchange of energy!

CIS 195 Information Society at Work
11932 CIS 195 01
Driven by the technology that is making the news this semester, students will explore the changes information technology has made in their lives and community, and learn how computer culture affects their work, study, family, and play though a hands-on technology approach. Using presentations on current IT topics, students are highly encouraged to debate and discuss the ethical problems of technology advancement. We will also discuss some aspects of business and what part CIS plays in business, as well as what defines the College of Business and how it fits into the university. Discussion topics will include: Why do we call it the information age?; Advancements in the auto industry; How has IT changed the music industry?; Robotics and what part they are playing in our lives; The digital divide; Wireless Technologies; Social Networking; Cloud Computing; Distance Education; The Power of Information; GPS; RFID; and Google. Students will take a hands-on approach with various technologies including: Webpage Development - Learn how to upload and save files to the server; Use Google docs to upload and work on files in teams; Use some of the current technologies that are available for free - which will help students throughout the rest of their college career.

COMM 190 - A User’s Guide to the Mass Media
81383 COMM 190 01
An increasing number of media streams vie for your attention every day. But the messages may not always be as simple as they seem. Learn to read between the lines and recognize the nuance and subtext of various media. Take a look behind the curtain to see how diverse motives, agendas and practices affect the media you consume and see how that same media responds and reacts to pressures and trends from you, the consumer. Media and culture are bound together in an elaborate dance. This course will help you understand that dance and will make you a smarter consumer of media.

EDCI 191 - Teachers, Schools, and Society
80138 EDCI 191 01
80139 EDCI 191 02
This course offers an interdisciplinary examination of the ways in which public policy debates about schooling reflect ideological differences in American society.  During our time together this semester, we will look at what “society” means and its influence on schools and education.  This will include the importance of evaluating the choices we’ve made so far in our lives, especially with regards to our own judgments.   Through this experience, we will practice thinking critically, through reading, writing and discussion, and consider options for the possibility of teaching as a career.

EDPY 190 - What is Education For?
82678 EDPY 190 01
In his 1990 book of essays, Wendell Berry uses the title to ask what seems like an odd question: What Are People For?  But, when we stop to ask ourselves this question, we may realize that we have never asked it before, and that to truly live in this world, we need to answer this question for ourselves.  We may also realize that for the education that we all pursue to have real meaning for us, we need to know what we as people are for and how our education transforms us makes us the people that we become.  In this course, we will stop and consider Mr. Berry’s question and use it to explore what we think education is for and how teaching and learning affect our lives.
In addition to Mr. Berry’s essay, we will read a novel to help us see how education utterly transforms the world that we see and how a limited worldview impacts our thinking.  We will also read articles, excerpts from books and watch videos and films about education, teaching and learning that will promote deep thinking and discussion about who we are and how our education helps us refine our definitions of self.

ENGL 190 - First Year Seminar in Literature             
81322 ENGL 190 01  
This first-year seminar’s topic is African American literature. We will read Alice Walker’s phenomenal novel The Color Purple and view the film directed by Steven Spielberg, then explore the south at the turn of the twentieth century through Zora Neale Hurston’s classic Their Eyes Were Watching God. Alongside the fiction, we’ll discover spoken word poetry—closely connected to hip hop—watch the poets performing it themselves on HBO’s Def Poetry, and give it a try ourselves.  Please see the course flyer! (link to pdf)

ENGR 199 - Introduction to Engineering Practices & Principles
80407 ENGR 199 01
81694 ENGR 199 02
80409 ENGR 199 30 – LAB
81699 ENGR 199 31 - LAB
Introduction to the engineering disciplines, curriculum, personal and professional development, teamwork, project planning, communication skills, and conceptual design engineering.  This is a required class for all students considering majors in engineering or engineering technology.     

ENVH 190 - From Black Death to Bioterrorism
80353 ENVH 190 01
80354 ENVH 190 02
80355 ENVH 190 03  
This course uses current events to examine basic public health concepts as they apply to the average U.S. citizen; critical evaluation of pandemic infectious diseases that could affect the majority of the human population (influenza, HIV), vector borne diseases (West Nile virus), bioterrorism disease agents (smallpox, anthrax), radiation, and/or chemical exposures; and an assessment of the various ways that the public can be protected. An essential course for any educated citizen, and of particular interest to those interested in community health or pursuing a health-related major.

FIN195-30 - You and Your Money
FIN195-30 CRN 82781
Do you want to learn how to manage your money?  Then this is the course for you.  With good money management skills you will be able to budget your money each month, reduce expenses, set financial goals and control your debt.  You will learn the good and bad of credit cards and how to establish a strong credit score.  This course will also introduce you to topics about insurance, investing and making large purchases such as a car or house.  Having a sound grasp of money management will make your college experience much more enjoyable as well as help you in the years beyond college when you will be faced with many important financial decisions.

GEOL 191 - Geology, Landscapes, and the Human Psyche
82165 GEOL 191 01
How and why human spirit and culture is linked to the physical world.
This class will explore the physical world – its appearance, climate, and ecology – and how this physical landscape affects human culture.  The aim of this course is to develop your sense of place from a geologic perspective, and to give you the understanding to connect human culture with the surrounding landscape.  Meet geology faculty and learn about why all humans are affected by how the earth works!  *** REQUIRED 4-day camping and hiking field trip over a weekend in September, either to Panthertown national forest near Cashiers, or to the Great Smokies Mountains National Park.  All camping gear is available through Base-camp Cullowhee, if needed. We will help you make these arrangements.  Dates TBA.***

HIST 190 – First Year Seminar in History                                 
81513 HIST 190 01
81529 HIST 190 02
Human interactions with nature and technology raise unavoidable and often deeply unsettling questions about our own place in the order of things.  What makes us human?  What are the implications of our relationships with non-human others?  How are the boundaries between the human and the non-human constantly negotiated and renegotiated in ways that shape our conception of what it means to be a human being?  This course takes up these questions through the lens of history of science and technology, examining the complex practical and conceptual relationships we have with what is marked out as non-human. We’ll look at everything from animals in the ancient world, to Dracula, to the implications of genetic engineering in the present day. Our readings will include original scientific texts and other primary documents, novels and short stories, and historical accounts of human/non-human relationships.  We will also examine films and other visual media that depict human confrontations with the non-human.  The main course themes include the complicated and often blurred boundary between humans and other animals, the implications of human relationships to non-human others of our own making—both imaginary and technological—and the prospects of a post-human future.

JPN 190 -  Introduction to Japanese Pop Culture
81743 JPN 190 01
The class will introduce some aspects of Japanese popular culture through following topics; Martial arts, Cuisine and Animation.  The class will be conducted in various teaching methods including reading, writing, discussion, hands-on experience, and visual aids.

LAW 195 - Contemporary Legal Issues
82805 LAW 195 01
This course will look at conflict resolution by evaluating litigation, mediation and negotiation as a means to settle disputes. It will follow a dispute through the appellate level and also introduce students to mediation and the skill set necessary to mediate disputes. Finally it will offer a practical and easy approach to learning how to negotiate effectively in a legal and business context.

MUS 191 - Integral Arts                                             
80710 MUS 191 01                                                                                      
For new first year students only, this course will explore the integral  nature of the arts: how we live, record our life and world, and imagine our future.  Whether we paint, sculpt, act, sing, dance, or write, we have something to share.  Often, many or even all of the art forms work in concert to share their vision.   This course is arts intensive and is strongly recommended for those with an interest in the arts.  As students examine the intersections of art to art and arts to life, this course will bring theory to life through experience and engaged collaboration. This course is part of a triad that includes THEA 191 and ART 191.  All three sections collaborate as a partnership to provide a rich arts experience as students and instructors from all three sections interact in a dynamic exchange of energy!

PAR 190 - Freedom, Culture, and Utopia  
82657 PAR 190 01
This course will examine, from a historical-philosophical perspective, several utopian visions in Western thought.  We begin with a brief study of the Spartans and their utopian experiment, proceed to Plato’s Republic, then examine Marcus Aurelius’ ideal of the Stoic sage in his Meditations, look at More’s Renaissance Utopia, then study some scientific and socialist utopian schemes (Skinner, Marx & Engels), consider some feminist utopias, and conclude by looking at technological utopias and an ecotopian vision.  Along the way, we will raise questions about how these utopian schemes impact human freedom, and also consider critics’ suggestions that utopian schemes seem to end in dystopian disasters.  Finally, we will learn how to examine all these ideas through the philosopher’s lens of a moral vision that informs our understanding of utopias and dystopias.

PSC 190- Law and Conflict Management
82046 PSC 190 01
This course is designed to expose students to conflict resolution and management skills in the American legal system.  The course covers the nature of interpersonal conflict, disputes in the public sector, as well as traditional and non-traditional methods of managing disputes such as coercion, negotiation, arbitration, mediation, and litigation. The course requires study of case studies and/or participation in a group project that exposes students to the interests of parties in real-world public policy conflicts in the Western North Carolina region. 

PSY 190 - Race and Prejudice
82222 PSY 190 01
As a psychological and cultural concept, race continues to have much influence in contemporary (post-racial?) American society.  In this seminar we not only explore the concept of race from the perspective of psychology; we also move beyond psychology to take a broader, social-science perspective on race and prejudice. Drawing on a range of theoretical, empirical, and experiential resources in psychology, as well as anthropology and cultural biology, we construct responses to the many questions about race: How real is race? What is biological fact and fiction? What are the roles of culture and ethnicity? How do we learn race and racism? Can racism be unintentional? Is a post-racial society possible or even desirable?

THEA 191 - Integral Arts                
80719 THEA 191 01
For new first year students only, this course will explore the integral nature of the arts: how we live, record our life and world, and imagine our future.  Whether we paint, sculpt, act, sing, dance, or write, we have something to share.  Often, many or even all of the art forms work in concert to share their vision.   This course is arts intensive and is strongly recommended for those with an interest in the arts.  As students examine the intersections of art to art and arts to life, this course will bring theory to life through experience and engaged collaboration. This course is part of a triad that includes ART191 and MUS 191.  All three sections collaborate as a partnership to provide a rich arts experience as students and instructors from all three sections interact in a dynamic exchange of energy!

Honors First-Year Seminars: Fall 2011
ENGL 190-HON - First Year Seminar in Literature: The Literature of Home and Belonging 
81323 ENGL 190 01                                                                                    
As an introduction to some facets of “English” as a discipline, this Honors Freshman seminar will explore different ways that “home,” “family,” and “a sense of belonging,” are presented in short stories, poetry, essays, and film. For example, we will read Barbara Kingsolver’s 2001 collection of personal essays, Small Wonder, as well as Sir Thomas More’s 1516 fictional “novel,” Utopia, Khaled Husseni’s A Thousand Splendid Suns, and Jonathon Safron-Foer’s Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close. Short stories and poems by American and international authors, and films such as A River Runs Through It, The Joy Luck Club, and Little Miss Sunshine will provide other views and perspectives in addition to an introduction to different literary genres. Further, the class will engage in experiential and service learning projects ranging from climbing the Climbing Wall to build community within our class, doing service learning projects together, and perhaps helping to build homes for local organizations.  Each student will also do a “Family Heritage Project,” which involves an interviewing a family member and doing an oral presentation. We will visit the Mountain Heritage Center to learn about the history of WCU, Cullowhee, and Sylva, and we will help build homes with “Habitat for Humanity.” Students will do a variety of writing assignments, from literary and film interpretation to personal as well as researched essays.

ENGL 191-HON  - Writing & Editing Imagine Magazine
88324 ENGL 191 70 Honors
Honors Tutorial - Imagine magazine, a publication of The Honors College, highlights the research, service, and creative contributions of outstanding WCU undergraduates.  In this unique first-year seminar, students serve as the staff of Imagine magazine. They conduct interviews, write and edit articles, and arrange photo shoots for this award-winning publication.  Open only to Honors students

 

Copyright by Western Carolina University      •      Cullowhee, NC 28723      •      828.227.7211      •      Contact WCU
Maintained by the Office of Web Services      •      Directions      •      Campus Map      •      Emergency Information      •      Text-Only

Office of Web Services