First Year Seminars Fall 2010

CRN SUBJECT COURSE SECTION

ART 191 - Integral Arts 
82231  ART  191  01
For new first year students only, this course will explore the integral nature of the arts: how we live, record our life and world, and imagine our future.  Whether we paint, sculpt, act, sing, dance, or write, we have something to share.  Often, many or even all of the art forms work in concert to share their vision.   This course is arts intensive and is strongly recommended for those with an interest in the arts.  As students examine the intersections of art to art and arts to life, this course will bring theory to life through experience and engaged collaboration.  This course is part of a triad that includes THEA 191 and MUS 191.  All three sections collaborate as a partnership to provide a rich arts experience as students and instructors from all three sections interact in a dynamic exchange of energy!

BIOL 192 - Plant Biodiversity
81398 BIOL 192 01
81660 BIOL 192 30 - LAB

This course explores Southern Appalachian plant diversity as a background in botanical sciences.  Students gain experience with field identification techniques and human use of plants in medicines, foods, and fiber.

BIOL 193 - Forensic Biology
CANCELLED

CIS 195 - The Information Society at Work
80968 CIS 195 01
Students explore the changes information technology has made in their lives and community, and learn how computer culture affects their work, study, family and play through a hands-on technology approach.

CJ 190 - Controversies in Criminal Justice
80440 CJ 190 01
80468 CJ 190 02
Topical issues in Criminal Justice are explored and discussed in the context of political and social realities of contemporary American society.

COMM 190 - A User’s Guide to the Mass Media
81031 COMM 190 01
If you have ever wondered how and why the media do what they do, this is the course that will help you discover the inner workings of what consumes so much of our time every day; the mass media.   This course is a back door into the media exposing how the media operate and the effects that the media have on people in their everyday lives.  

EDCI 191 - Teachers, Schools, and Society
80038 EDCI 191 01
This course offers an interdisciplinary examination of the ways in which public policy debates about schooling reflect ideological differences in American society.  During our time together this semester, we will look at what “society” means and its influence on schools and education.  This will include the importance of evaluating the choices we’ve made so far in our lives, especially with regards to our own judgments.   Through this experience, we will practice thinking critically, through reading, writing and discussion, and consider options for the possibility of teaching as a career.

ENGL 190 - Global Appalachia    
80802 ENGL 190 01
The southern Appalachians are extraordinarily rich in culture, history, and art. From the time that travelers first entered this area and encountered the Native Americans, they designated this region as “peculiar,” a place set apart and distinguished by great natural beauty and a unique heritage.   We will begin the class by discussing stereotypes many hold of the inhabitants of Appalachia and then develop a deeper understanding of this complex region and its inhabitants.  If you are from this area, I hope that this course will help you to appreciate your own “place” more fully.  If you are not from the mountains, I hope that you will gain a sense of the cultural richness of this area you have chosen to call home for your college years.  We will read stories, poetry, essays, nonfiction, and a novel or two.  We will complete a local service project, most likely with the Appalachian Homestead Farm and Preserve.  We will examine how the culture and history of a specific region shapes its inhabitants, as you consider how your own “place” has shaped you.

ENGL 190 – Literature and the Moral Life
82778 ENGL 190 03 (SECTION ADDED)
Throughout the centuries, humankind has struggled with the issue of knowing what is right and then choosing it. In this course we will explore what some of the greatest writers and thinkers in the Western tradition have had to say about ethics as we consider what it means to be a moral person in the 21st century. You will have opportunities to analyze the moral codes of various important characters in literature as well as to examine your own moral code at this important moment in your life. Democracies such as ours are based on the concept of citizens who possess a strong sense of right and wrong and their own means of self-regulation. Therefore, no subject is more important to our time than the concept of the moral life. Here is your chance to think about what that means to you! We will read short stories, poems, one novel, and one graphic novel, and view a couple of films. In this class you will read and write about literature and use it to formulate your own standards for knowing and choosing what is right.

ENGL 190 – First Year Seminar in Literature
80807 ENGL 190 70
This course will examine reading and writing about literature, with an emphasis on human experience and values.

ENGL 190 – First Year Seminar: Motion Picture Studies (NEW COURSE ADDED)
82779 ENGL 192 01  
Reading and writing about motion pictures, with an emphasis on critical viewing practices. The final project will be a student-run film festival.

ENGR 190 - Technology Systems: How Things Work
81443 ENGR 190 01
81445 ENGR 190 31 - LAB
81447 ENGR 190 32 - LAB

This is an introductory engineering course for non-majors.  Starting with natural curiosity, the interrelationships between engineering, physics, and mathematics are investigated in everyday objects. This course is designed to give non-science as well as potential science and engineering students alike a basic idea of what engineers do by exploring how things work – things like refrigerators, car engines, microwave ovens, computers, curveball pitches, roller coasters, light bulbs, automobiles, clocks, laser printers, and magnetically-levitated trains. 

ENGR 199 - Introduction to Engineering Practices & Principles
80629 ENGR 199 01
80652 ENGR 199 02
80648 ENGR 199 30 – LAB
80655 ENGR 199 31 - LAB
Introduction to the engineering disciplines, curriculum, personal and professional development, teamwork, project planning, communication skills, and conceptual design engineering. While this is a required class for electrical engineering majors, it is open to any student considering a major in engineering or engineering technology.

ENVH 190 - From Black Death to Bioterrorism
82281ENVH 190 01 
82282ENVH 190 02
This course uses current events to examine basic public and environmental health concepts as they apply to the average U.S. citizen; critical evaluation of various public health components such as environmental disease agents, radiation, chemical exposures, biological hazards (including potential bioterrorism agents), noise, air, water, and soil pollutants, and food safety; and, an assessment of the various ways that the public can be protected.

GEOL 191 - Geology, Landscapes, and the Human Psyche
81212 GEOL 191 01
How and why human spirit and culture is linked to the physical world. This class will explore the physical world – its appearance, climate, and ecology – and how this physical landscape affects human culture.  The aim of this course is to develop your sense of place from a geologic perspective, and to give you the understanding to connect human culture with the surrounding landscape.  Meet geology faculty and learn about why all humans are affected by how the earth works!  *** REQUIRED 4-day camping and hiking field trip over a weekend in September, either to Panthertown national forest near Cashiers, or to the Great Smokies Mountains National Park.  All camping gear is available through Base-camp Cullowhee, if needed. We will help you make these arrangements.  Dates TBA.***

GER 190 - Triumph and Tragedy Reflected in Modern German Film
81453 GER 190 70
From the licentious cabarets of 1920s Berlin to the rise and fall of Hitler's Nazi dictatorship to the emergence of modern terrorism, German history has often served as a harbinger of events that would only take place in the U.S. many years later. In this seminar students will gain insight into modern German culture and its complicated relationship to American culture through analysis of popular and critically acclaimed films depicting Germany's triumphs and tragedies of the 20th century. Our focus will be on honing the necessary cognitive skills and rhetorical strategies to make intelligent, effective and convincing arguments in the analysis of film in its historical and social context, above and beyond its function as an entertainment medium. Although students will increase their cross-cultural awareness in a specifically German-American context, the critical skills they develop in this course will serve them in any field of study they choose to pursue.

HSCC 191 - Is Inequality Making You Sick? 
81807 HSCC 191 01
Students in this interdisciplinary seminar will explore the connections between societal inequalities and poor health.  As “health crime scene investigators,” students will track down causes of diseases. Students will examine why it matters what neighborhood someone lives in, how much money her family has, what her racial and ethnic background is.  Students with diverse academic interests will be able to investigate the biological, social, and behavioral determinants that influence health differences by race, gender, education, and income inequality.  A variety of readings and narratives will be used to study the evidence-based biology of inequity and to consider patterns of structural violence and the political, economic, and social frameworks that can create health inequalities. Students will examine the roles of citizens, communities, organizations, reform movements, and health professionals in addressing inequality. Students may elect to participate as a volunteer with the faculty in the local free clinic.

JPN 190 - Introduction to Japanese Pop Culture (NEW COURSE ADDED)   
82765 JPN 190 01
The class will introduce some aspects of Japanese popular culture through following topics; Martial arts, Cuisine and Animation.  The class will be conducted in various teaching methods including reading, writing, discussion, hands-on experience, and visual aids.

LAW 195 - Contemporary Legal Issues
81085 LAW 195 01
Law for life: In every way and every day law is a major factor in our lives. From birth, to school, work, play, marriage, home buying, credit, children and even death, the law governs our actions and decision-making. Emphasis is placed on providing practical legal knowledge and topics such preparing to meet with a lawyer, writing a will, establishing credit, buying a home and calculating child support payments will provide hands-on activities. Students will investigate the impact of law on everyday life and explore the fundamental operations of the legal system.

MUS 191 - Integral Arts
82233 MUS 191 01
For new first year students only, this course will explore the integral nature of the arts: how we live, record our life and world, and imagine our future.  Whether we paint, sculpt, act, sing, dance, or write, we have something to share.  Often, many or even all of the art forms work in concert to share their vision.   This course is arts intensive and is strongly recommended for those with an interest in the arts.  As students examine the intersections of art to art and arts to life, this course will bring theory to life through experience and engaged collaboration. This course is part of a triad that includes THEA 191 and ART 191.  All three sections collaborate as a partnership to provide a rich arts experience as students and instructors from all three sections interact in a dynamic exchange of energy!

ND 190  - Extreme Nutrition Makeover
81850 ND 190 01
81855 ND 190 02
 (SECTION CANCELLED)
How do I avoid the freshman 15?  What are the healthiest foods to eat on campus?  Should I still be taking vitamins?  Explore the answers to these questions and more, design your own personal eating plan (chocolate cream pie included) and discover how the foods you eat influence your appearance, energy level, health, and longevity.

PAR 190 - Freedom, Culture, & Utopia
82219 PAR 190 01
This course will engage you in the study of classic utopian visions of ideal societies, along with criticisms arising from the implications for human freedom in such communities.  Explorations will range from a brief study of the Spartans as one of the 1st attempts at utopia in the Western tradition, to recent scientific and science fiction utopias/dystopias – from American religious utopian experiments, to the moral quandaries connected with the quest for biotechnological perfection.  Through an interdisciplinary approach, perspectives will be offered by professors in Biology, History, and Sport Management.

PSC 190 – Active Citizenship: Making a difference in your community
81383 PSC 190 01
This course will introduce you to examples of political activism and application of successful principles to enhance the quality of life in the WCU community.

PSY 190 - Race and Prejudice – A Learning Community
81820 PSY 190 01 – LC02
As a psychological and cultural concept, race continues to have much influence in contemporary (post-racial?) American society.  In this seminar we not only explore the concept of race from the perspective of psychology; we also move beyond psychology to take a broader, social-science perspective on race and prejudice. Drawing on a range of theoretical, empirical, and experiential resources in psychology, as well as anthropology and cultural biology, we construct responses to the many questions about race: How real is race? What is biological fact and fiction? What are the roles of culture and ethnicity? How do we learn race and racism? Can racism be unintentional? Is a post-racial society possible or even desirable?
NOTE:  This course will partner with English 101-75 (81896) to form a learning community that will engage an interdisciplinary approach to exploring and writing about issues examined.  You must be enrolled in both. 
Read more about this Learning Community (LC02), “How Real is Race?:How Race is Real: Race as a psychological and cultural concept in contemporary (post-racial?) America.”

THEA 191 - Integral Arts
82232 THEA 191 01
For new first year students only, this course will explore the integral nature of the arts: how we live, record our life and world, and imagine our future.  Whether we paint, sculpt, act, sing, dance, or write, we have something to share.  Often, many or even all of the art forms work in concert to share their vision.   This course is arts intensive and is strongly recommended for those with an interest in the arts.  As students examine the intersections of art to art and arts to life, this course will bring theory to life through experience and engaged collaboration. This course is part of a triad that includes ART191 and MUS 191.  All three sections collaborate as a partnership to provide a rich arts experience as students and instructors from all three sections interact in a dynamic exchange of energy!

Honors First-Year Seminars: Fall 2010

 

ENGL190-HON - The Literature of Home and Belonging
80804 ENGL 190 02 Honors
As an introduction to some facets of “English” as a discipline, this seminar will explore different ways that “home,” “family,” and “a sense of belonging,” are presented in short stories, poetry, essays, and film. For example, we will read Barbara Kingsolver’s 2001 collection of personal essays, Small Wonder, as well as Sir Thomas Moore’s 1516 fictional “novel,” Utopia. Short stories and poems by American and international authors, and films such as A River Runs Through It, The Joy Luck Club, and City of Joy will provide other views and perspectives in addition to an introduction to different literary genres. Further, the class will engage in experiential and service learning projects, such as doing a “Family Heritage” interview and oral presentation, learning about the history of Sylva and Cullowhee, and helping build homes with “Habitat for Humanity.” Students will do a variety of writing assignments, from literary and film interpretation to personal as well as researched essays.

ENGL 191-HON  - Writing & Editing Imagine Magazine
81421 ENGL 191 01 Honors
Honors Tutorial - Imagine magazine, a publication of The Honors College, highlights the research, service, and creative contributions of outstanding WCU undergraduates.  In this unique first-year seminar, students serve as the staff of Imagine magazine. They conduct interviews, write and edit articles, and arrange photo shoots for this award-winning publication.  Open only to Honors students

PSC 190-HON  - Conflict Management
81446 PSC 190 02 Honors
This course is designed to expose students to conflict resolution and management skills. The course covers the nature of interpersonal conflict, disputes in the public sector, as well as traditional and non-traditional methods of managing disputes such as coercion, negotiation, arbitration, mediation, and litigation. The course requires study of case studies and/or participation in a group project that exposes students to the interests of parties in real-world public policy conflicts in the Western North Carolina region. 

 

Copyright by Western Carolina University      •      Cullowhee, NC 28723      •      828.227.7211      •      Contact WCU
Maintained by the Office of Web Services      •      Directions      •      Campus Map      •      Emergency Information      •      Text-Only

Office of Web Services